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086 - EARLY EVOLUTION OF RELIGION

 
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Re: 086 - EARLY EVOLUTION OF RELIGION
by Jim Downs - Wednesday, 18 September 2019, 11:06 PM
 


  86:0.1 THE evolution of religion from the preceding and primitive worship urge is not dependent on revelation. The normal functioning of the human mind under the directive influence of the sixth and seventh mind-adjutants of universal spirit bestowal is wholly sufficient to insure such development.

  86:7.6 Primitive religion prepared the soil of the human mind, by the powerful and awesome force of false fear, for the bestowal of a bona fide spiritual force of supernatural origin, the Thought Adjuster. And the divine Adjusters have ever since labored to transmute God-fear into God-love. Evolution may be slow, but it is unerringly effective.

The first and last paragraphs give us a good picture of the plan of the Universal Creator for his immature children.

(2:1.10) Because the First Father is infinite in his plans and eternal in his purposes, it is inherently impossible for any finite being ever to grasp or comprehend these divine plans and purposes in their fullness. Mortal man can glimpse the Father's purposes only now and then, here and there, as they are revealed in relation to the outworking of the plan of creature ascension on its successive levels of universe progression. Though man cannot encompass the significance of infinity, the infinite Father does most certainly fully comprehend and lovingly embrace all the finity of all his children in all universes.

A Parable:

There is [an ancient Zen] Chinese story of an old farmer who had an old horse for tilling his fields. One day the horse escaped into the hills and when all the farmer’s neighbors sympathized with the old man over his bad luck, the farmer replied, “Bad luck? Good luck? Who knows?” A week later the horse returned with a herd of wild horses from the hills, and this time the neighbors congratulated the farmer on his good luck. His reply was, “Good luck? Bad luck? Who knows?” Then, when the farmer’s son was attempting to tame one of the wild horses, he fell off and broke his leg. Everyone thought this very bad luck. Not the farmer, whose only reaction was, “Bad luck? Good luck? Who knows?” Some weeks later the army marched into the village and conscripted every able bodied youth they found there. When they saw the farmer’s son with his broken leg they let him alone. Now was that good luck or bad luck? Who knows? Everything that seems on the surface to be an evil may be a good in disguise. And everything that seems good on the surface may really be an evil, depending on your attitude. — Father Anthony de Mello, S.J. (1931-1987) Sadhana – A Way to God

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 86:3.4 It was the realization of impotency before the mighty forces of nature, together with the recognition of human weakness before the visitations of sickness and death, that impelled the savage to seek for help from the supermaterial world, which he vaguely visualized as the source of these mysterious vicissitudes of life.

3:5.5.The uncertainties of life and the vicissitudes of existence ... All evolutionary creature life is beset by certain inevitabilities. Consider the following:
3:5.6.1. Is courage—strength of character—desirable? Then must man be reared in an environment which necessitates grappling with hardships and reacting to disappointments.
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3:5.10.5. Is the love of truth and the willingness to go wherever it leads, desirable? Then must man grow up in a world where error is present and falsehood always possible.

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 86:5.7 ... ordinary dreams are not the methods employed by the personalities of the spiritual world when they seek to communicate with material beings.

110:5.3. During the slumber season the Adjuster attempts to achieve only that which the will of the indwelt personality has previously fully approved by the decisions and choosings which were made during times of fully wakeful consciousness, and which have thereby become lodged in the realms of the supermind, the liaison domain of human and divine interrelationship.

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 86:7.4 ... Scientific knowledge, leading to scientific action, is the only antidote for so-called accidental ills.

(36:5.9) 4. The spirit of knowledge—the curiosity-mother of adventure and discovery, the scientific spirit; the guide and faithful associate of the spirits of courage and counsel; the urge to direct the endowments of courage into useful and progressive paths of growth.